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What people say about us

"Nicola is one of the sharpest observers of the voluntary sector scene and has some of the best contacts. Reliability 100%."

David Brindle, Public Services Editor, The Guardian


 

"I was really pleased with the case studies – very concise but with lots of real voices in there which is really important. Thanks for all your work."

Dan Watson, Communications Manager, Paul Hamlyn Foundation


 

The book is an excellent resource for social workers, carers and prospective carers. Proud Parents details the real life experiences of 16 families, a mixture of lesbian and gay, singles and couples, and adopters and foster carers.  This book is a true triumph for Nicola Hill, and I hope that this book is added to with future volumes.

Stuart Bray, Equality and Diversity Co-ordinator, Core Assets


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I have found Laura to be a first-class writer, editor and designer who rapidly understood our distinct style and needs. She has since become a reliable contributor as writer, editor or designer for a succession of our publications and now provides essential editorial support for a small organisation like ours.

David Emerson, Chief Executive, Association of Charitable Foundations


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Nicola has done a wide variety of work for us, ranging from editing our magazine to researching and writing booklets, books and toolkits, and without exception she has provided an excellent service. Her writing and editing skills are of the highest quality which, combined with her first-class organisational skills and her in-depth knowledge of the sector, result in flawless work and absolute reliability. And she's a really nice person as well!

Jane Heath
Former Assistant Director Outreach Services
Volunteering England


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Reviews of Nicola Hill’s book, The Pink Guide to Adoption

The Intercountry Adoption Centre
The British Journal of Social Work
Amazon


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Nicola and Laura have been producing The Bulletin for nearly 10 years and survey after survey shows how much our members truly value the magazine. It is always of the highest quality and interest. What’s more, Nicola and Laura are always willing to ‘go the extra mile’ - they help with our other publications and print-buying and I know I can always rely on them for good advice on our publications strategy.

Graham Ball, former Chief Executive, The British Polio Fellowship


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May I say The Bulletin is a really excellent magazine and I always look forward to receiving it."

"Congratulations on the excellent Bulletin much enjoyed by both of us. Reading it provides both information and entertainment."

"Congratulations on the new Bulletin. I could not put it down until it was read from front to back. Each article is so informative. Keep up the good work.

British Polio Fellowship Bulletin readers


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Thought you'd like to know the toolkit on volunteering, Pass it On, went down really well with Volunteer Centres - a really tough group to please, so they genuinely like it. Well done!

Mark Restall, Former Head of Information, Volunteering England


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Nicola Hill is a very efficient editor who understands the design and production process - making my life easier.

Darren Westlake, Art editor, Centurion Press


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Having Laura on our team is a great boon. She is totally reliable and I know I can always depend on her to do what it takes to meet and exceed the high standards we set for our publications. Whether in a production role or interviewing executives at the highest level in the financial world, she is thorough, accurate and personable.

Ian Welsh, co-founder of communications consultancy IWJK


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The Institute of Fundraising turned to Nicola Hill when we wanted to develop our membership communications through the expansion of our magazine Update. Nicola combined an extensive practical and academic knowledge of Fundraising with the skills and experience of an established journalist and editor. This proved to be the winning combination and the results exceeded our expectations.

Lindsay Boswell, former Chief Executive, Institute of Fundraising


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Review of Proud Parents by Oxford University

As a gay parent I have heard past criticism from both the gay and straight communities that LGB adoption and fostering makes children the latest must-have accessory for gay people.  Reading Proud parents by Nicola Hill gives a reassuring insight into the world of Lesbian and Gay fostering and adoptive parents, their motivations, their struggles, their successes, and the thoughts and feelings of young people placed with them. This book also demonstrates how things have changed over time, and that attitudes have definitely changed positively towards lesbian, gay, and bisexual fostering and adoption.

The book is an excellent resource for social workers, carers and prospective carers.  It is very evident that the contributors have given their frank honest experiences.  They are not trying to draw a comparison between gay and straight parenthood, they are sharing their reality, their methods, and what makes them good parents.

Proud Parents details the real life experiences of 16 families, a mixture of lesbian and gay, singles and couples, and adopters and foster carers.  Each family describes their motivations to become parents, what sacrifices they have made, difficulties and joys they have experienced, and the battles along the way.  Graham and Charlie adoptive parents of two boys state “We couldn’t love our children any more if they were our birth children”, Stephanie and Jenny also explain about their experiences of being foster parents “It is extremely rewarding seeing a child  change from the time  when they arrive at your door with a small bag  of things to becoming a confident and mature young person, contributing to society and pursuing activities with a circle of friends”. One of the best things about reading these accounts is that sexual orientation is evidently just a small part of the way these families define themselves, and their motivations are to be parents and make positive and lasting differences to the lives of young people.

For social workers reading these accounts, they all contain handling tips for social workers, this gives an excellent insight into the how families see their experiences during the assessment and matching processes.  Every social worker will put this book down having a greater understanding of the needs to LGB families and family’s needs in general, an understanding that is not taught at University. Eduardo and Colin stated “You also need to make sure you would ask a heterosexual man the same questions as you ask a homosexual man.  Don’t make us jump through more hoops than straight men or women. Be supportive of lesbian and gay adopters.”

Overall the book made me smile, sometimes feel angry about the ways these people have been treated, and feeling warm hearted about the comments that young people have made about their new parents.  It is an easy read, and is ideal to be left on your coffee table for anyone to dive in for ten minutes for inspiration and sometimes just to be a little bit nosey.  This book is a true triumph for Nicola Hill, and I hope that this book is added to with future volumes.

Reviewed by Stuart Bray, Equality and Diversity Co-ordinator, Core Assets

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